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Election 2020: Garden City Voter Guide

GARDEN CITY, NY — Voters in Garden City will head to the polls Tuesday, Nov. 3, for the 2020 general election.

In addition to the presidential and congressional races, there are several key races at the state and local level. Voting will be different this year thanks to rules approved to expand early and mail-in voting in light of the coronavirus pandemic.

The deadline to register to vote is Oct. 24. You can check your voting status on the Secretary of State’s website, where you can also find your polling place.

There are several ways residents can vote:

Mail-In Voting

Vote-by-mail applications must be received by the Nassau County clerk by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 27.

The ballot itself must either be personally delivered to the board of elections no later than the close of polls on Election Day, or postmarked by a governmental postal service not later than

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Here are the 11 House races to watch on Election Day

WASHINGTON — With so much focus on the presidential race and battle for the Senate, it’s easy to lose sight of the key contests for control of the House.

So we’ve got you covered.

With Republicans needing to flip a net 17 seats to regain control of the House, and with the Cook Political Report saying it’s more likely than not that Democrats add to their majority, here are the 11 House contests we’ll be watching.

Suffice it to say that the party that wins a majority of these 11 House races will end up having the better Election Night/Week/Month.

Endangered GOP incumbents (3)

Arizona 06: (GOP incumbent David Schweikert is running against Democrat Hiral Tipirneni)

Pennsylvania 01: (GOP incumbent Brian Fitzpatrick is running against Democrat Christina Finello)

New Jersey 02: (Party-switching GOP incumbent Jeff Van Drew is running against Democrat Amy Kennedy)

The GOP-held open seats (3)

Indiana 05:

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AutoZone and Three Other Retailers to Buy for the Election

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AutoZone is on Wells Fargo analyst Zachary Fadem’s list of best ideas..


Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

With the presidential election just over three weeks away,

Wells Fargo

took a look at what the results could mean for the retail sector. The bank found that the best bets are in home improvement and auto parts.

Analyst Zachary Fadem noted that Democratic nominee Joe Biden, now leading in the polls, has pledged to return corporate taxes to their level before the 2017 tax cuts, at around 28%. While that might be a concern for investors, he said retailers have advantages that could help offset the pain.

If limits on state and local tax deductions are also removed, he said, many consumers may spend more. Potential new tax credits, such as for child care, could also put more money into the pockets of low- and middle-class consumers, funds they might use for

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2020 Election Live Updates: Despite Concerns of Health Experts, Trump Plans Rallies at White House and in Florida

Here’s what you need to know:

Credit…Anna Moneymaker for The New York Times

President Trump is planning to host hundreds of people on the South Lawn of the White House on Saturday for his first in-person event since he announced he had tested positive for the coronavirus, three people familiar with the plans said on Friday, and his campaign announced that he would hold a rally in Florida on Monday.

The president was expected to make remarks from one of the balconies at the White House to the crowd, which was expected to include people attending an event elsewhere in Washington staged by a Trump supporter, Candace Owens, one of the people familiar with the plans said. The event, which was first reported by ABC News, continues Mr. Trump’s pattern of using

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Both parties prepare for possibility of contested election as chaotic White House race hurtles to a close

She has also directed some of her members to be ready if GOP legislatures in states with narrow margins or unfinished counts seek to appoint their own electors, a situation Democrats hope to head off with an obscure law from the 19th century that allows Congress to intervene.

The internal talks are among a number of strategy sessions taking place in political and legal circles in anticipation of a post-Election Day fight. The campaigns of President Trump and former vice president Joe Biden are preparing for all scenarios, each amassing robust legal teams to prepare for post-Nov. 3 disputes, in addition to monitoring Election Day activity and ballot counting.

An uncharted battle over who the next president will be, after a campaign that has roiled and exhausted Americans, could severely test the nation’s faith in its election system — and undermine the principle that the president should be selected by

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House Democrat accuses Ratcliffe of politicizing election security intelligence

Rep. Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinOvernight Defense: Congress recommends nuclear arms treaty be extended | Dems warn Turkey | Military’s eighth COVID death identified Bipartisan congressional task force recommends extending nuclear treaty with Russia Wray: Racially motivated violent extremism makes up most of FBI’s domestic terrorism cases MORE (D-Mich.) on Wednesday accused Director of National Intelligence John RatcliffeJohn Lee RatcliffeDemocrats demand DHS release report warning of election interference Democrat asks intelligence director if Trump’s personal debt is security problem Comey defends FBI Russia probe from GOP criticism MORE of politicizing election security intelligence on behalf of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump and Biden’s plans would both add to the debt, analysis finds Trump says he will back specific relief measures hours after halting talks Trump lashes out at FDA over vaccine guidelines MORE and urged him to take a number of steps to improve transparency.

Slotkin, a former CIA officer

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White House, Covid-19, election, Big Tech, China

California’s expansive August Complex Fire is now a gigafire — a term for a blaze that burns at least a million acres of land.



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© Emojipedia


Here’s what you need to know to Get Up to Speed and On with Your Day.

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1. White House 

President Trump says he has ordered his negotiators to stop discussing a new stimulus deal until after the election. His announcement sent stocks plunging and sparked new uncertainty among people in particularly hard-hit industries, like airlines. While Congress has butted heads for months over stimulus proposals, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin seemed to be mounting a strong new effort to get a deal done soon. Now, experts warn of what may happen to the economy with further aid still

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White House down – Covid upturns the US election (again): the 9 October Guardian Weekly

Video: Undecided voters ‘clear losers’ from chaotic first US presidential debate (France 24)

Undecided voters ‘clear losers’ from chaotic first US presidential debate

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The old adage is that a week is a long time in politics – this year’s US election is making a day in politics feel like an eternity. Since we went to press last week, hot off revelations about Donald Trump’s tax returns, we witnessed the miserable spectacle of the first presidential debate in Cleveland. That event – an international embarrassment for the US – was quickly overshadowed a few days later by the news that the president and his wife, Melania, had both tested positive for coronavirus.



Photograph: GNM


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: GNM

The resulting chaos – a four-day stay in hospital, many of Trump’s inner circle also testing positive and the still-ill Trump’s supposedly triumphal return to the White

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White House OKs FDA asking for 2 months monitoring, likely delaying vaccine authorization past Election Day

The White House denied reports it had tried to block the new FDA guidance.

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Democratic chair of House committee investigating Speaker Michael Madigan accuses GOP of ‘wearing two hats,’ says no more meetings until after election

Accusing his Republican counterparts of engaging in “political theater” ahead of the Nov. 3 election, the Democratic chairman of a special Illinois House committee investigating the conduct of longtime Speaker Michael Madigan said Tuesday that the panel won’t meet again until the polls close.



Emanuel Chris Welch et al. looking at a laptop: State Rep. Emanuel "Chris" Welch addresses issues concerning seclusion in Chicago Public Schools during a meeting of the Illinois State Board of Education at the Thompson Center in Chicago, Nov. 22, 2019.


© Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
State Rep. Emanuel “Chris” Welch addresses issues concerning seclusion in Chicago Public Schools during a meeting of the Illinois State Board of Education at the Thompson Center in Chicago, Nov. 22, 2019.

State Rep. Emanuel “Chris” Welch of Hillside said in a statement that the three GOP lawmakers on the special investigating committee, formed in response to a petition from House Republican leader Jim Durkin of Western Springs, “are wearing two hats.”

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“While sitting on a committee that is charged with conducting an impartial investigation based on the petition filed by Leader Durkin, the Republican members of this committee

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