Garden Equipment – FAQs

A lot depends here upon the type of equipment you are speaking about.

For a start, anything that is electrically powered should be thoroughly checked out by someone qualified before you plug it in and start trying to use it.

The same is obviously true of anything powered by an internal combustion engine. If you buy something that is, to put it bluntly, in a mess, then you may spend a long time regretting it and writing out some hefty cheques to try and put things right.

In the case of manual tools, providing the price is right and they’re in good condition, you should have no issues.

For anything more complicated, buying second-hand can be a good way of saving money but it might be prudent to only buy from an experienced and registered dealer in agricultural and garden equipment.

Is it true that zero-turn lawnmowers can easily be flipped over?

No!

Providing you buy a quality model from a major recognized manufacturer, you should have no problems whatsoever.

However – and this is important, if you’ve really set your mind at doing silly things with motorised garden equipment then ultimately you can turn almost anything over.

So, stay within the guidelines as outlined by the manufacturer’s handbook and you should have absolutely no issues.

How safe are chainsaws to use?

Chainsaws are extremely powerful and potentially highly dangerous pieces of equipment.

Now to be clear, they’re only dangerous if you misuse them or have failed to follow the advice about learning how to use them to begin with.

Depending upon the size of the saw concerned, you may in some situations also need a degree of physical strength in order to use them securely and safely. They are heavy and after a while, if you’re not used to them, they can put stress on your arms and shoulders. That’s a good signal to stop.

Never ever allow young people to use a chainsaw unsupervised or preferably, at all. Never ever use one while you’re precariously perched at the top of a ladder.

You must also under absolutely all circumstances, use the range of approved safety equipment. That would include helmet, ear protection, face protection, heavy duty armoured gloves and armoured boots too.

You may have seen people using them with none of those things and dressed only in tee shirt and shorts. Don’t follow their example!

Is an electric chainsaw better than a petrol version?

This is a great question that regularly causes lots of arguments!

Broadly speaking, electric chainsaws have the advantage of typically being slightly lighter, quieter and they are also a little less temperamental. That’s something you’ll understand if you’ve ever been furiously and unsuccessfully trying to start a recalcitrant petrol-engine version!

However, they are limited in terms of their range due to needing access to power sockets and they are usually less powerful than their combustion-engine cousins. Their use in tight spaces can also be a problem due to the fact that you are dragging a cable behind you.

It’s also not unknown for people to saw through their own electric cable when they’ve got into a mess (make sure you have emergency circuit breakers always in line).

It’s something of a generalisation but many professionals doing heavy-duty regular cutting will, for a number of reasons, choose a petrol version. Electric chainsaws tend to be more popular in suburban environments where the load to be placed on the saw is likely to be less frequent and lighter overall.