Boston chef shares gardening tips to bring bounty to table

Is your thumb more brown than green? A Boston chef is sharing tips and tricks to help your garden grow — no matter how much space you have.“I talk to people all the time who say, ‘If it’s a plant, if it is possible to live, I will find a way to kill it,” chef Jason Jernigan said.Jernigan has a rooftop garden where herbs and veggies are bountiful. He said there are two herbs that are easy for first-time growers.“The first thing I started growing was basil. It’s just such a versatile herb, and it is easy to grow,” he said. “Mint is one of the things that you can definitely start off with. It is very hearty. It is forgiving, so if you forget to water it just like anything else it is going to let you know. It smells great.”Jernigan offered advice when it comes to potting vegetables, fruits and herbs.“When you keep them in smaller pots, you’re less likely to overwater them, which tends to be a big problem with people starting off with plants,” he said. When you harvesting herbs, break them from the base and don’t just tear off the leaves,” he said.”We want to generate new growth. We want these herbs to be giving back to us all season. Learning exactly the best way to prune them is also beneficial,” he said.He also said don’t stress and have fun with it.“Experiment with basil in ice cream,” he said. “I’ll take a good bottle of red wine, toss that into my ice cream maker, spin that around, throw some fresh herbs in there, a little bit of simple syrup and some seltzer water, and that turns into the most magical drink for summertime that you can ever imagine. I encourage people to step outside your comfort zone. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes, because mistakes are only what you make them.”Jernigan also said you can freeze fresh herbs at the end of the season or dry them out so they can be used for months. Watch video below to learn out to make 5 ingredient tomato sauce using home-grown basil.

Is your thumb more brown than green? A Boston chef is sharing tips and tricks to help your garden grow — no matter how much space you have.

“I talk to people all the time who say, ‘If it’s a plant, if it is possible to live, I will find a way to kill it,” chef Jason Jernigan said.

Jernigan has a rooftop garden where herbs and veggies are bountiful. He said there are two herbs that are easy for first-time growers.

“The first thing I started growing was basil. It’s just such a versatile herb, and it is easy to grow,” he said. “Mint is one of the things that you can definitely start off with. It is very hearty. It is forgiving, so if you forget to water it just like anything else it is going to let you know. It smells great.”

Jernigan offered advice when it comes to potting vegetables, fruits and herbs.

“When you keep them in smaller pots, you’re less likely to overwater them, which tends to be a big problem with people starting off with plants,” he said.

When you harvesting herbs, break them from the base and don’t just tear off the leaves,” he said.

“We want to generate new growth. We want these herbs to be giving back to us all season. Learning exactly the best way to prune them is also beneficial,” he said.

He also said don’t stress and have fun with it.

“Experiment with basil in ice cream,” he said. “I’ll take a good bottle of red wine, toss that into my ice cream maker, spin that around, throw some fresh herbs in there, a little bit of simple syrup and some seltzer water, and that turns into the most magical drink for summertime that you can ever imagine. I encourage people to step outside your comfort zone. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes, because mistakes are only what you make them.”

Jernigan also said you can freeze fresh herbs at the end of the season or dry them out so they can be used for months.

Watch video below to learn out to make 5 ingredient tomato sauce using home-grown basil.