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LSU Garden News: Those tiny moths you see are producing webworms that are killing your lawn | Home/Garden

Across the state, lawns are in trouble.

Sod webworms are the main culprit this year, said LSU AgCenter Extension specialist Ron Strahan.

“The numbers are biblical,” Strahan said. “We have observed nearly every house on a single street with damage in the lawn.”

The first sign that your lawn might have a problem are small moths that are light brown to dark brown with striping on the wings. They fly around as you walk through the grass or around outdoor lights at night. These moths lay eggs on grass blades.

Larvae hatch a week or so later, maturing into adult moths in three to five weeks. There can be two or more generations each year.

Larvae are amber in color but become greener as they feed on the blades of grass at night, causing damage to the lawn.

Another sign of sod webworms are yellowing and browning patches of dead

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