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Secure Halloween Decor, Long Period Of Windy Weather Ahead For Colorado

DENVER (CBS4) – If you have Halloween decor outside you may want to make sure it is extra secure Tuesday. That’s because starting Tuesday night and into Wednesday we have several rounds of strong and gusty wind on the way.

Some of the strongest gusts will likely be in the mountains and foothills of Boulder County and Larimer County where the National Weather Service has issued a High Wind Watch. The current forecast calls for gusts to approach 80 mph at times.



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A shift in the jet stream will drive the wind over the next few days. There is an area of low pressure currently above Washington that will move to the east between now and Thursday, carving out a large trough of lower pressure.

At the surface a strong cold front will race through Colorado late Wednesday with much colder air. The pressure gradient

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A Barrett Court could carry on Trump’s deregulatory agenda long after he’s left the White House, experts say

Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court has brought the public’s attention to divisive social issues like abortion rights, but replacing the late Justice Ginsburg with a more conservative figure could have an equally important effect on business regulation and the U.S. economy.



a person wearing a suit and tie: Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump's nominee to the Supreme Court


© Getty Images
Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court

“Barrett is likely to be a pro business justice, to restrict the ability of government to adopt some economic regulations, and would likely vote to expand the constitutional rights of business,” said Adam Winkler, constitutional law professor at UCLA and author of the book “We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights.”

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That could be good news for stock-market investors, as analysts have long pointed to the Trump Administration’s efforts to roll back Obama-era regulations and slow the implementation of new rules as a major driver

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Trump immigration restrictions expected to impact economy long after he leaves White House

Big tech firms like Google have been among the biggest beneficiaries of the H-1B visa program in recent years. <span class="copyright">(Associated Press)</span>
Big tech firms like Google have been among the biggest beneficiaries of the H-1B visa program in recent years. (Associated Press)

President Trump’s four-year crusade against immigration has pushed the number of foreign workers and other immigrants arriving on American shores down to the lowest level in decades.

That’s pleased Trump’s supporters, but it will almost certainly cost the nation dearly in the future, with slower job growth, fewer start-ups and a weaker overall economy, economists, business leaders and immigration analysts say.

Among the most damaging of Trump’s anti-immigration efforts, according to experts, is his renewed push to deny visas to foreign workers with special skills and expertise that U.S. companies need.

Two rules issued this week, one by the Labor Department and the other by the Department of Homeland Security, are expected to make it significantly harder for tech firms — many of them in California and elsewhere on

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Trump Tempted Fate Long Before Rose Garden Coronavirus Cluster

(Bloomberg) —

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Ever since March, when much of the country went into lockdown to contain the coronavirus, Donald Trump has tempted fate — ignoring his own administration’s advice on avoiding the virus, yet managing to avoid it all the same.

There was a June rally inside a Tulsa arena, and a convention speech to 2,500 people on the South Lawn of the White House in August. Then came de facto political rallies, which gave way to full outdoor rallies, which gave way to indoor ones. All gathered Trump supporters, largely maskless, tightly packed together, and yet the president — a habitual germophobe even before the pandemic — always emerged unscathed.

But they all paled next to last weekend’s celebratory introduction of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, where roughly 150 guests sat shoulder-to-shoulder in the White House Rose Garden. Senators and other Republican luminaries worked the crowd, shaking

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A White House Long in Denial Confronts Reality

Ms. Hicks, a longtime aide who is one of the president’s closest advisers, was more concerned, colleagues said. She took more precautions than most others and sometimes wore a mask in meetings.

Colleagues said that newcomers to Mr. Trump’s orbit, like Kayleigh McEnany, the White House press secretary, never wore a mask in his presence, in what was interpreted by other staff members as an attempt to please the new boss.

As the months progressed, there were so few reported virus cases in the White House — a valet to the president, a top aide to the vice president and Robert C. O’Brien, the national security adviser, all tested positive — that aides to the president grew even less concerned.

By June, the month before Mr. O’Brien tested positive, the White House had already stopped conducting temperature checks for people entering the complex. Only those aides who were interacting directly

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Home Depot Has Long Dominated America’s Newest Pastime: Home Improvement Projects

It all started with a firing—a very foolish one.

In 1978, Bernie Marcus and Arthur Blank were executives at Handy Dan, a home improvement chain based in Southern California. Despite the business being very profitable, the pair had begun to tinker with a new idea. By lowering prices, they found, the stores’ volume shot up, making Handy Dan even more money. The executives had planned to implement that strategy systemwide, but they never got the chance. Corporate raider Sanford C. Sigoloff—who liked to call himself the “Skillful Scalpel”—took over the company, and deciding to save himself two salaries, got rid of Marcus and Blank.

That one decision probably prevented Handy Dan from becoming America’s home improvement leader. Instead, that honor would go to a place called The Home Depot.

Recruiting investment banker Ken Langone and retailer Pat Farrah, who’d run National Lumber and Supply Company, Marcus and Blank opened up

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